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Tag Archive for hazardous substances

January 13th, 2017

Tier II Reports (aka: Community Right-to-Know Reports) Due March 1st

iemaEach year, facilities with hazardous chemicals on hand must submit Tier II (Community Right-to-Know) forms by March 1st for the previous calendar year.  The Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) requires submission electronically using their Tier II Manager program.  Printed copies must also be submitted to the facility’s Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC) and fire department.

Submission of Tier II form is required under Section 312 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA). The purpose of this form is to provide State, local officials, and the public with specific information on potential hazards. This includes the locations, as well as the amount, of hazardous chemicals present at your facility during the previous calendar year.

Tier II reports must include:

  • Details of the types and quantities of chemicals stored on site, above reporting thresholds.  Most chemicals have a minimum reporting threshold of 10,000 pounds. Extremely Hazardous Substances (EHSs) must be reported above 1 – 500 pounds, depending on the substance. Any quantity of phosphorus, for example, must be reported on the Tier II forms.
  • Type and location of storage container
  • A detailed site plan that meets minimum mapping requirements
  • Electronic Safety Data Sheets (SDSs)
  • Emergency contact information

If you need assistance completing your facility’s Tier II report, contact Gabriel’s Consulting Department at 773-486-2123 or WaterDept[at]gabenv.com.

April 1st, 2015

Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Spotlight: Government Records Review

During the course of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment, Gabriel reviews government records from a variety of federal, state, local, and tribal agencies.  We will review all pertinent records available, including, but not limited to: underground storage tanks (USTs); hazardous materials stored, used or disposed; environmental violations; building permits; occupancy permits; fire inspection records; construction permits; demolition permits; and closure projects.

These records help us determine if hazardous substances or petroleum products are currently or were previously located on the site.

Case Study

Recently, Gabriel was conducting a Phase I ESA at an auto repair facility in Chicago.  The current owner/occupant did not have any knowledge of USTs on the property.  osfm

However, during a search of Illinois Office of the State Fire Marshal (OSFM) and Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) records, it was discovered that three tanks were installed at the property between 1972 and 1979, prior to the current owner purchasing the property.  The previous owner had operated the property as a gas station in addition to the repair shop, so a diesel tank, gasoline tank and used oil tank had been installed.

None of these tanks had any record of removal, which means there is a strong likelihood that the tanks are still on site and possibly leaking due to their age and material.

If you have questions about how Gabriel uses government records reviews in our Phase I research, contact Natalie Neuman, Group Leader Assessment Services, at 773-486-2123 or nneuman[at]gabenv.com.